General Kit List

The club provides kit such as helmets, walking axes, crampons, ropes and harnesses. We also have a good selection of 1:50,000 and 1:25,000 scale maps for the areas that we visit plus compasses and map cases. As members progress they are encouraged to purchase their own kit so as to reduce the chance of a shortage occurring.

 

Individual kit list for a Mountaineering Club trip, some things will not be required on all trips, such as sleeping bags or liners which are generally required for wild camps or some bunkhouses. ALL of the items listed above in bold are ESSENTIAL. Read further on for more information on particular items of required kit. Any questions, do ask a member of the committee.

EQUIPMENT

 

CLOTHES

ESSENTIALS

COMFORT

WINTER ESSENTIALS

Rucksack

Waterproof Rucksack Liner

Sleeping Mat

Sleeping Bag

Toiletries

Towel

Survival Bag

Gloves

Gaiters

Sun/warm hat

Balaclava

Head Torch

Whistle

Walking Boots

Walking socks

Thermal layers

Fleece

Waterproof trousers

Waterproof jacket

Walking trousers (no denim)

Spare emergency clothes

Pub Clothes

Underwear (yes it is on the list because people have forgotten it!)

Breakfasts

Lunches

Waterbottles

Suncream

Sunglasses

Snack food

Emergency 24 hour rations

Book

Camera

Money

Spare Shoes

Ear plugs

Thick walking socks

Crampon compatible Walking Boots

Gaiters

Spare gloves (3 pairs is a good start)

Spare Warm clothes, essential!

Pub Clothes

More Water

Suncream

Goggles

Buff/balaclava

Warm hat

SLEEPING MAT

These are needed for some huts and when we camp. Note the club owns some tents.

SLEEPING BAG

How warm your bag needs to be is a very personal thing. But bear in mind that some huts can be very cold in the depths of winter (sometimes not even in the winter). Additional liners and clothes can be used to increased the rating of bags.

EMERGENCY SURVIVAL BAG

 

The orange bag is a truly essential (and versatile) bit of kit, they are cheap (about £2!) and could save your life.

 

GLOVES

Finding truly waterproof gloves is a real challenge, the main aim is to keep your hands warm (even if they are damp), so it is useful to have more than one pair. Top Tip, keep your water bottle in a spare mit in winter to stop the bottle freazing! Spare socks can be used as mitts at a push. Spare dry clothes, gloves, hat and socks should all be carried in the rucksack liner.

 

GAITERS

These are optional except for in winter.

 

WALKING BOOTS

These need to be owned. Make sure you try on plenty of pairs and that they are waterproof.

 

WALKING SOCKS

One thick pair at least, carrying a spare set in your rucksack. Or be very clever (and immensely smug back in the hut) and avoid blisters by using some thin liner socks underneath the thick ones. This avoids feet rubbing as much and thus avoids blisters. Coolmax liners are made by a variety of brands and are very comfortable.

 

THERMAL LAYERS

The layering system is very important, especially when it's cold. This is because air is trapped between the layers, increasing the warmth. So several thin layers will always be warmer than one thick layer. The layering system also allows for easy regulation - if your too hot, then just remove a layer or two, and vice versa if your too cold. Wicking tops such as ‘dryflo’ or wollen clothing should be worn in preference to cotton. [Down/feather jackets are very warm but those without a waterproof outer and inner aren't much use in the wet conditions ‘sometimes’ found in Scotland. Microfibre/primaloft etc. Belay jackets will tolerate getting wet and stay warm and are a very good idea if youre going to be standing around a lot, for instance climbing ]. The picture below shows the layering principle quite well.

WATERPROOFS

A good waterproof jacket with a decent hood is essential. Waterproof overtrousers are often needed and it’s worth remembering that lightweight waterproofs can be inadequate under severe winter conditions. [Overtrousers with a full length side zip are not essential.]

HAT

A warm hat is essential and the easiest way to regulate your temperature. Balaclavas are great when the wind blows.

 

HEADTORCH

Spare batteries should also be carried. LED varaints are great for following a track or path, checking the map and reading on the bus or back in the hut as they have good battery life, for serius outside use go for single "supperbright" LED. Halogen/Zenon beams are better for spotting over distances. Combination torches give the best of both but are more expensive.

 

WALKING TROUSERS

lightweight fast drying trousers are the best. Thermal ‘longjohns’ or fleecy trousers are good when it gets really cold. Remember cotton and especially denim jeans must not be worn.

 

RUCKSACK & LINER

A 30L - 40L daysack is adequate for most of our trips, for winter a 40L or 50L might be more appropriate. Proprietary liners can be bought but a rubble sac bin liner (usually £1 a roll from Wilko’s and the like) works well. Don’t be temped to buy the biggest rucksack and then fill it, remember “Speed is Safety”.

 

EMERGENCY 24 HOUR RATIONS

Don’t forget to take extra food over and above your lunch just in case you should become benighted!

 

EAR PLUGS

A few pennies will buy you a priceless good night's sleep!!

GENERAL KIT LIST

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